Deploy your Rails 3 applications à la Heroku with Inploy

I’m not a fan of Heroku‘s deployment way, but I know that many people is and that many of them don’t know that with Inploy you can deploy your Rails 3 applications in a similar way.

Thomas Ritz contributed with Inploy creating a template called rails3_push. The template modifies Inploy so it creates a repository in the server on setup and pushes to it on every update, being followed by all the tasks that it executes by default on every deploy.

In order to use this template, like any other, you must specify it in the deploy.rb file:

template = :rails3_push
application = "tweerer"
hosts = %w(...)
...

After that, to setup your server and to deploy to it, you can execute respectively the following commands:

inploy setup
inploy

If you appreciate this work, please consider to recommend me at Working With Rails and to follow me on Twitter.

Test today your JavaScript code in a Rails 3 application with Blue Ridge

Case you want to test today your JavaScript code in a Rails 3 application in a simple way, Kristian Mandrup forked Blue Ridge and migrated the generators to the new interface. The commits haven’t been merged yet into the official repository and the code has some minor bugs, so I created another fork and fixed them.

Until all the commits got merged in both repositories, you can execute the following commands to get a configured environment:

git submodule add -b rails3 git://github.com/dcrec1/blue-ridge.git ./vendor/plugins/blue-ridge
rails g blue_ridge:skeleton
rails g blue_ridge:javascript_spec core
rake spec:javascripts

Case you don’t know Blue Ridge, Dr. Nic posted some time ago about the tool and he uploaded also a video from a presentation he gave at Rails Underground 2009.

If you appreciate this work, please consider to recommend me at Working With Rails.

Develop Rails 3 applications with your favorites gems without headaches

As today, starting developing a Rails 3 application using the default libraries is very easy, but when we want to use those tools that were great in Rails 2, some problems begin to appear.

These problems aren’t caused in any way due that Rails or the libraries are unstable. What happens is that a lot of plugins and gems had to update their integration with the framework and some chose to create pre-release versions, others to create branches and others just to bump to a new version, which means we have to hunt which version to use and from where in order to get compatible features.

To simplify the work of many people and to encourage the adoption of Rails 3, I decided to create a template that configures the gems I most use in my projects and installs them in the application, along with other tasks that can be easily followed in the script.

If you appreciate this work, please consider to recommend me at Working With Rails.